menu

Topic:

Uncategorized

TSA Rolls Out A New Website…and It Needs Work

Last week, TSA rolled out its new website. If the GAO were writing a review of the site, it would no doubt conclude that “progress has been made but much work remains to be done.” In fact, there is so much more work that needs to be done that I’m surprised TSA released it when it did.

On This Date in 1968

A humble gift of rhyme to commemorate the birthday of the late, great Christopher Lee Battle.

Chris Battle – One Year Later

It was one year ago today that we got the news that Chris Battle had lost his fight against kidney cancer. He knew Security Debrief was a part of his legacy, and he wanted it to grow beyond its beginnings and be around long after his battle with cancer had ended.

Chemical security – Keeping It Straightforward

Last week, the House passed a bill reauthorizing the Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards (CFATS) program. While the bill keeps the program going for 3 years at a time, the legislation institutes a program largely unchanged from its current form…which is a good thing.

DHS Sec. Johnson Fires All Public Affairs? Rand Paul Bans Kites? CBP has a Used Car Salesman? Really?!

In Security Debrief’s fifth annual April Fools coverage, we’ve collected some stories the rest of the media somehow missed.

Congress Heal Thyself – a Ray of Hope from the Senate

At Wednesday’s Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs committee confirmation hearing for Stevan Bunnell as DHS General Counsel and Suzanne Spaulding as Under Secretary of NPPD, both Chairman Tom Carper and Ranking Member Tom Coburn decried the number of leadership vacancies at DHS. Senator Carper and Coburn’s comments are a positive development, even if the political headwinds are very strong.

The House has an Opportunity to Shift the Mood on Immigration Reform

By Lora Ries and Chris Wiesinger
At pivotal points in the nation’s history, immigration reflected an openness to the world and the possibilities of the American future. Current immigration reform initiatives also reflect a vision of the future, but that vision is static and lacks optimism because it aims to fix the mistakes of the past instead of building a foundation for the future. The House of Representatives has key opportunities to shape immigration into something that reflects an optimistic vision of America’s future.

An Active Shooter in DC – Lessons from Aaron Alexis’ Attack on the Washington Navy Yard

The shooting at the Washington Navy Yard this morning stole the lives of 12 Americans who expected nothing more than another Monday spent serving their country. As with other tragic, violent incidents, there is a fog of facts and speculation circulating in the media. In the coming days, debates will rise in the press, in government and among the public. While debate and discussion is important, it will not diminish a repugnant reality. No place in this country is ever completely safe from the threat of violent actors.

Entering the Era of Homegrown Violent Extremism

As the United States enters another chapter in the ongoing effort to protect U.S. citizens and assets, the phenomenon of homegrown terrorism is likely to take center stage, requiring a new approach and perspective toward homeland security. This is the subject of Homegrown Violent Extremism, a new book from counterterrorism expert and fellow Security Debrief contributor Erroll Southers.

Do We Have Options In Egypt?

Media coverage of the overthrow of the Muslim Brotherhood (MB) government in Egypt by the military has generally been lopsided and focused on the military’s various violations of human rights. Americans often believe that every conflict involves “good guys” and “bad guys.” I would argue that we have to stop looking for good guys where we are not likely to find any and instead focus on our interests, which are to support the army in its efforts to stabilize Egypt.