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Contributor:

Gary S. Becker

Gary S. Becker is the Chief Economist for Catalyst Partners, LLC. In this role, Becker offers economic analyses to clients on matters relating to homeland security, including the cost impact of proposed and final rulemakings. He offers advice on how to save money while achieving desired security benefits.

He holds more than 35 years of experience as an economist working in the private sector, as well as working (in chronological order) at: the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Department of Labor; Department of Transportation; Office of Management and Budget; Department of Agriculture; and most recently, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS).

From 2004 through the end of 2014, Becker served as Senior Economist for the DHS Private Sector Office (PSO), Office of Policy. He took the lead role in formulating, analyzing and informing other senior staff on the economic impact of DHS policies, procedures, actions, and rulemakings on the private sector. While at DHS, he worked closely with a number of components including, Customs and Border Protection (CBP) and the Transportation Security Administration (TSA), and focused on performance measures and issues such as wait times and customer service. His analyses helped support CPS’s Global Entry and TSA’S Pre✓™ programs.

Before joining DHS, Becker served as a senior economist at a number of different federal agencies, writing and reviewing the economic analyses of hundreds of proposed and final rules. At the Federal Aviation Administration, he developed the economic analysis on the use of child safety seats that still continues to allow guardians the option to purchase an airplane seat for their infant if they choose. He also developed the economic analysis on aircraft ground deicing.

Becker has completed his Ph.D. coursework in Agricultural Economics from The Ohio State University. He holds a M.S. degree in Agricultural Economics from The Ohio State University and a B.S. degree in Natural Resources and Environmental Science from Purdue University. He was born in Washington, D.C and has two children. He currently resides with his wife, Ruth, in Bethesda, Maryland.

Improving Processing Times at US Citizenship and Immigration Services

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services has a problem with processing times for applications. They’re too long.

Big Jump in Public Complaints to TSA Over Processing Times

TSA has seen a substantial increase in complaints since September 2017. The data proves it.

The Cost of Waiting – Economic Consequences from Wait Times at US Border

Wait times at U.S. borders are a disincentive for entering the country, which has far-reaching economic impacts.

Trends in Latest TSA Customer Service Data Show Successes, Challenges

TSA collects a variety of customer service data, which reveal important trends in complaints and compliments that impact aviation and homeland security.

TSA Complaint Data Reveals Airport Screening Trends

TSA is required to make its customer service information available to the public, and the data shows areas for improvement and emerging trends in aviation passenger and cargo screening.

Virtual Kidnappings on the Rise – Law Enforcement Needs to Do More

Transnational organized criminal groups are using virtual kidnapping to extort money from Americans, and the U.S. law enforcement response seems to fall short.

After Hurricanes, Building Business Resilience Through Preparedness

Recovery efforts continue after hurricanes battered parts of the United States, and some businesses are struggling to return to normal operations. The value of preparedness affects day-to-day business operations, and we need to advocate the notion of being prepared.

Reducing the Economic Impact from Hurricane Harvey

Harvey could be the most costly natural catastrophe in U.S. history. But by focusing on resilience and restoring business operations, it might not need to be.

Improving DHS Rulemaking through Public Comments on Regulatory Costs

Though regulations are intended to advance public wellbeing, during the rulemaking process, federal agencies often make missteps in factoring potential costs imposed by regulatory actions. This is where public participation in the regulatory process is essential.